Monday, July 29, 2013

GERMAN STREET FOOD - beyond the pretzel

 German Street Food is a year-round sensation



Your nose is your best guide on your culinary adventure through Germany.  Trust your nose.  It will never steer you wrong.  The smells wafting across a crowded market square, along a busy sidewalk, or next to the Bahnhof (train station) in any German town or city will call to you.  YOU MUST HEED THE CALL! 





Hand-twisted German Pretzels
Here's your chance to reconnect with some cherished old favorites, but also delight your palate with something bold and new.  Your options are endless and you'll likely  run out time before you run out of choices.

Explore the rich ethnic cuisine of Europe on almost every German street corner. Immigrants from around the Mediterranean and from almost every European country brought their food specialties with them after WWII and Germans happily embraced the diversity of flavors and cooking techniques.

Making a food memory
There's an art to German street food culture, but don't worry; it comes naturally.  Licking sticky fingers without shame, wiping your greasy chin with the back of your hand, or shrugging off the occasional food-stained clothing all go with the territory.  And it's a small price to pay for the full German experience.  You'll be sharing your food stories with friends for years or until they finally buy their own plane ticket to Germany.

A classic Schnellimbiss booth








PEDESTRIANS in Germany have an answer to America's drive-though fast food craze: "Schnellimbiss".  The word "schnell" means "fast" and "Imbiss" means "snack" or "bite".  However, servings are often large enough to satisfy a big appetite. Here's the difference between a Restaurant, an Imbiss, and a Schnellimbiss.  Restaurants have a waitstaff and range from upscale and pricy to pub-like and affordable.  An Imbiss is a casual dining concept, typically without a waitstaff, in a building with indoor or indoor/outdoor seating.
Highly popular Döner Kebabs share the spotlight with Pizza


The "SCHNELLIMBISS" can take the shape of a tiny hut, an attractive kiosk, a portable stand, an outdoor walk-up window, a well-equipped food truck, a motorized cart, or a humble pedal-powered hot or cold box.  But, it's not unusual to find a Schnellimbiss housed in a permanent structure within a train station, an airport, or a shopping mall.  To be successful they only require three key ingredients:  crowds of hungry people, well-prepared food, and a health safety certificate from the governing authority.






Some Popular German Street Foods:

  • BERLINER, etc. (Krapfen, Beignet, Fettgebäck, Quarkkäulchen, Mutzenmandeln, and lots more) Various versions of fried dough including the famous jelly doughnut.
  • BREZEL (may also be known as Bretzel, Brezl, Brezn, Brezerl, Breze, and other regional variations). It's the classic pretzel.
  • LAUGENBREZEL is a popular variation of the traditional pretzel made from wheat flour, malt, salt, yeast and water.
  • "Süße" BREZEL is a sweet pretzel that is typically coated with cinnamon sugar. 

    Grilled Bratwurst
  • BRATWURST is a large category of sausages, including variations made from pork, beef, veal, poultry or combinations of two or more.  Textures vary from course to super fine.  Some sausages are smoked. The size, shape, and taste of the sausage can vary greatly by region, but you are not likely to be disappointed by any of them.  Don't be afraid to try them all.  Bauernwurst, Thüringer, Frankfurter Rindswurst, Würzburger, the legendary small Nürnberger Bratwurst "Drei im Weckla", and many more.


    Currywurst
  • CURRYWURST a tasty pork bratwurst, served whole or sliced.  One of the most popular street foods of all times, it's topped with Currysauce or Curryketchup and an extra dusting of curry powder.  Ask who invented Currywurst and you are likely to get a lively debate, with most giving credit to Herta Heuwer.  In 1949 Herta concocted a sauce from ingredients supplied to her by soldiers in the British sector of Berlin.  It's now a staple in Germany.


    A Döner Kebab Vendor
  • DÖNER KEBAB (Kebap) is seasoned meat (lamb, veal, beef, chicken or a combination of two or more meats) that is slow-roasted on a vertical, rotating spit.  The meat is sliced and wrapped in a flat-bread, pita, or roll.  Toppings can include tomatoes, peppers, cabbage, onions, lettuce, and pickled cucumbers. Typically credited to Turkish  immigrants, this dish also has variations unique to any number of countries in Europe, like the Greek "Gyro".



  • FISCHBRÖTCHEN (Fischsemmel) A crusty roll with any number of delectable seafood toppings, including marinated herring, Bratherring (battered and Fried fish that has been pickled),  crab, smoked salmon, eel, and other smoked seafood.  Endless choices, often topped with fresh onions.
  • FLAMMKUCHEN a specialty of the Alsatian region of Germany close to the border with France.  The bread dough (often in a rectangular shape) is covered with Gruyere cheese, creme fraiche, thinly-sliced onions, and bacon.   It's baked, pizza-style, in a wood-fired oven until the topping bubbles and the crust is brown.
  • GEBRANNTE MANDELN (Gebrannte Nüsse) Street-roasted almonds or other nuts are almost impossible to resist.  Crunchy, chewy, and warm, with the perfect combination of sugar and cinnamon, makes them the perfect snack as you stoll down the street of almost every German city and town.
  • EIS (Eiscreme) is a street favorite.  Many Eisdiehlen or Eiscafes (ice cream shops) serve an Italian specialty that combines sugar, salt, egg-white, lemon juice and a variety of fruits and nut flavors, as well as vanilla and chocolate..  It's a refreshing alternative to the cream-based varieties that are equally popular.  Cafes serve ice cream specialties that are creative and delicious.  The famous Black Forest Cherry bowl (Schwarzwälder Kirsch Schale) combines ice cream, whipped cream, cherries, chcolate and Kirschwasser.  And then there's the delightful "Spaghettieis" where vanilla ice cream is extruded through a "spaghetti" press and topped with a "tomato sauce" of strawberry puree and "Parmesan cheese" of ground nuts.

  • "Pommes mit Fritessaus
  • POMMES FRITES (Pommes, Fritten) is a popular street food all over Germany.  It is often served with mayonnaise ("mit Mayo") or with Fritessaus, which is similar.  But tomato ketchup is equally popular.  For those who just can't decide they can opt for both, by asking for "rot-weiss" (red-white).


  • REIBEKUCHEN (Kartoffelpuffer, Reiberdatschi, Kartoffelklitscher) A potato pancake, often served with apple sauce.
  • WEISSWURST A mild, finely-ground sausage that is typically simmered gently and served with a sweet, Bavarian mustard (süßem Senf).  The casing is not eaten.  This video demonstrates "How to eat Weisswurst".
  • WIENER (Wienerl, Krenwürstchen, Frankfurter Würstel) A long slim sausage with a snappy casing that is gently simmered.








Sunday, June 23, 2013

What's a German gal to do when Gluten is VERBOTEN?

Wheat, barley, and oats are off the menu!
Nein!!!  That was my silent scream when my sister pointed out a few years ago that I might be allergic to gluten because of how I reacted every time I bit into any with a hint of wheat as an ingredient.

A wake-up call! As president at GermanDeli.com I was soon involved in working with our Purchasing folks to add more imported Gluten-free options to our product mix.
Schweinshaxe is G-F

Sausages and Meats...

Most of the meat products we carry are already gluten free because - with few notable exceptions - they are produced without fillers.

Candies and Chocolates
Many of our candies and chocolates are also gluten-free.  The obvious exception are those that include wafers, pieces of cookies, or wheat to bind ingredients.

Many (not all) Kinder items are GF
Most gummi candy is GF










Please visit our Gluten Free page, where you can find everything from gluten-free pasta, to soup broth, protein bars, and apple syrup. And also take a look at our catalog at GermanDeli.com where we have many more gluten-free items.

If you need to consult with us about what ingredients are in our products, please don't hesitate to call us at 1-877-GERMANY (437-6269) or email us at Support@GermanDeli.com.


Friday, June 7, 2013

Germans in Sunny Florida still crave German food

Some informal online research I just conducted claims that Germans get, on average, 167 days of  rain, sleet, snow, or hail annually.  I'm no math whiz, but I believe that's roughly 47% of the year!  In other words, Germans have to contend with more than their fair share of gloomy weather.  Couple that with an average annual temperature of 48°F and you quickly understand why Germans like to head to Florida.
Fact: Germans love sun and sand

It's no surprise that the prospect of "Fun in the Sun" is just too tempting for Germans to resist.  Many will head to Italy or Spain, but those with the means to do so will pack their bags and try to spend as many weeks as possible as in the legendary "sunshine state" of Florida.  It is not unheard of for some Germans to buy or rent a home or condo and spend every bit of six months as temporary Floridians, heading back to Germany only when their tourist visas reach their expiration dates.  By then it is usually summer in Germany, at last.

The thing about Germans is, they want it ALL.  Fun, sun, and...German food.  Huh?  Did I just say "German food"?  READ AN ARTICLE about Germans in Florida Sun Magazine.

That's right; when the thrill of American fast food is gone and super-expensive American steak or seafood restaurants have lost their luster, Germans find themselves craving real German Jacobs, Tchibo, Eduscho, or Dallmayr Kaffee.  Their teeth want to bite into a firm piece of Roggenkruste or a crunchy-crusted Brötchen with real German Butter or Käse.  Their palates demand Kartoffelpuffer or Spätzle.

Fact: Germans love to entertain
Not to mention that a German in Florida may want to show off their culinary skills to their American neighbors or their newly-found Yankee friends.  For that they may need real imported HoWe Bratwurst from Nürnberg, real imported Löwensenf, real imported Knorr Fix, real imported Hela Curry Ketchup, real imported Abraham Schinken, and more of the foods and brands they begin to miss from back home in Germany.

That's where it gets tricky.  Where does a German in America get German groceries?  Occasionally they'll find the odd German product in the gourmet or "ethnic" section of a local supermarket.  If they find a decent local German-themed restaurant, they might locate a shelf or two of German food items, but generally it's a meager selection, at best.

The good news is GermanDeli.com has been around for the last 14 years serving those lusting for goodies from the Heimatland.  FULL DISCLOSURE:  I'm one of the owners.  And I am such a proud owner.  Why?  Well,  because we really do have the best selection of German, Austrian, and Swiss food in the USA.  We have on average 3,500 products in stock in the summer and almost 5,000 products October - December.  And we really do know how to ship chocolate and meat in the middle of a hot summer from hot Texas to hot Florida or anywhere there is a heatwave. And our customer service is top notch!

Oh, and we have the best slogan in the business:  "It's not about the food; It's about the memories."  Just ask any German who has been away from Germany for more than a week or two and I bet they will agree.

Saturday, June 1, 2013

Rumtopf (The famous German "rum pot")


www.GermanDeli.com sells Rumtopfs in 3 & 5-liter sizes

Mention the word "Rumtopf" around a German and you will likely get a big smile and a story.  The story will most likely include a few "characters" like a German mother, grandmother, or other relative who was the designated rumtopf-maker of the family.

Memories of of growing and hand-picking their own fruits and/or visiting a German Farmer's Market for ripe, juicy, fresh fruits and berries is a whole chapter in the Rumtopf story.  The tale will continue with poetic words describing how, as the growing season progressed, more and more layers of fresh fruits  "at their peak" were added to the classic ceramic crock.  Each fruit layer is then covered with copious amounts of sugar and a rich, dark or medium-dark rum (see RECIPE below).  The whole magical concoction was then covered tightly and hidden away in a cool place, like a cellar or the back of a refrigerator.

The story-teller will laugh with memories of how at least one family-member would be too impatient to wait as the fruit marinated for months.  After all, the idea is for the rumtopf to be enjoyed during the winter months when fresh fruit is scarce.  Patience is called for.  However, most family stories include at least one scamp who would dip into the crock well before the rumtopf was fully-ready to be presented (typically with great fanfare) around the Holidays in December.

Languishing in a marinade of rich, dark (or medium) rum, the tipsy fruit (often a melange of cherries, peaches, plums, nectarines, pineapple, strawberries, grapes, pears, etc.) is served as a warm or cold compote with or without whipped cream or crème fraîche.  It is also marvelous warmed-up and served over vanilla ice cream or alongside a piece of simple pound cake. In other words, this story has a happy ending.

Gift idea:  A pretty glass jar with a tight seal, filled to the brim with your home-made Rumtopf concoction makes a wonderful holiday gift for a special someone.


The beginning of the story really should include a chapter on how the ceramic crock is hand-made in Germany.  The family rumtopf is often handed down from generation to generation, so it is only fitting that the maker of the rumtopf be part of a solid German family business.  Keramik Seifert produces food-safe, dishwasher safe ceramics for many household purposes.  The Rumtopf holds a special place within their high-quality ceramics.  Each one is also lovingly hand-painted.  Their production facility (Töpferei Seifert) is a popular tourist attraction in the charming little village of Königsgau, Germany, and tourists to Rothenburg ob der Tauber will be delighted to find a well-stocked Keramik Seifert Shop.  This video (in German) gives you a little peek into the Seifert family operation.

Where to buy your RUMTOPFhttp://www.germandeli.com/rumtopf.html

The RECIPE for Rumtopf: is simple.

1.) Into a clean dry rumtopf add the first layer of fruit.  The best fruits are firm-fleshed fruits like: cherries, peaches, plums, nectarines, pineapple, strawberries, grapes, pears, etc.  Select only fruits that are at their peak of flavor and texture.  Slice or cube fruit into pieces that will fit onto a fork or spoon.  It is not necessary to remove the skin of most fruits.  However, be sure to discard pits, seeds, and stems.  Leave any berries (like strawberries) whole.  Avoid fruits that are or will become mushy.  Bananas and melons are not a good option because they are too soft.  Blueberries can discolor the liquid.  Citrus fruits are not good choices for a rumtopf, but unpeeled grapes (without stems) are perfect.

2.) Generously sprinkle fine-grained sugar over the fruit layer.  Then pour a good-quality (unflavored) rum (dark or medium) over the fruit and sugar until the liquid just covers all the fruit in the crock.  Don't use a spiced rum because the flavors of the fruit won't shine through enough.

3.) Place the lid onto the rumtopf to minimize evaporation.  The GermanDeli team even likes to cover the lid and opening in extra plastic.  Store the Rumtopf in a cool location.  Personally, I like to place the rumtopf in the refrigerator because the intoxicating smell of sugar, fruit, and brandy can be a real magnet to fruit flies.

4.) As you progress through the summer, add more and more layers of fruit, sugar, and rum.  It doesn't harm anything to stir the fruits, but do so gently because you want the pieces of fruit to keep their shape as much as possible.  As you remove fruit for the rumtopf for serving, try and replace it with more fruit. Enjoy the fruits of the season in all their glory.

GermanDeli.com has been around for the last 14 years serving those lusting for goodies from the Heimatland.  FULL DISCLOSURE:  I'm one of the owners.  And I am such a proud owner.  Why? Well,  because we really do have the best selection of German, Austrian, and Swiss food in the USA.  We have on average 3,500 products in stock in the summer and almost 5,000 products October - December.  And we really do know how to ship chocolate and meat in the middle of a hot summer from hot Texas to hot Florida or anywhere there is a heatwave. And our customer service is top notch!

Oh, and we have the best slogan in the business:  "It's not about the food; It's about the memories."  Just ask any German who has been away from Germany for more than a week or two and I bet they will agree.

Thursday, May 9, 2013


DALLMAYR PRODOMO COFFEE...


What's behind the name, the "Haus", the bean, and its loyal following?

The name "Prodomo" is derived from the Latin "for the home".  The home or house theme plays well at Dallmayr.

This family-owned German Coffee company has a 300 year-old heritage at it's headquarters in this stately "Haus".  The building was all but destroyed during the second world war and lovingly reconstructed in the 1950s to its former glory.

While Dallmayr holds the title of "Purveyor to the Royal Bavarian Court" in its hometown of Munich, it has also supplied 14 other royal houses throughout Europe.

The Haus of Dallmayr, located at Dienerstraße 14, München, Germanyis famous for its coffee and even for its tea, cocoa, and chocolate.  Visitors to Munich are drawn to its world-famous delicatessen, bakery, and gourmet food shop.  Yes; the pastries actually really do look as sumptuous as in this photo and they taste as scrumptious as they look.

Over 1.4 million tourists visit this institution of fine dining, rivaled only by the same number of locals who flock there whenever they decide they must treat themselves to the "best of the best"; an elegant five-course dinner; a humble crusty roll with cold cuts, or a plate of delicately-smoked salmon.

Please note, this is no ordinary delicatessen; its a hallmark of fine European cuisine.  If you visit Munich, make the Haus of Dallmayr part of your agenda.
Here in the USA consumers are likely to be most familiar with Dallmayr's Prodomo coffee.  The online store, GermanDeli.com, hails Dallmayr Prodomo coffee as one of its top-selling items among thousands of other German and European products.


As in Germany, where Prodomo has a strong following and is available in most supermarkets, I'm beginning to see this coffee appearing on grocery shelves across the USA.  Dallmayr has a solid distribution chain for its Prodomo brand, in particular, and even though it is considered to be a "gourmet brand" the price is still affordable for most household budgets.

Why it's so good.  The Attributes of Dallmayr Prodomo:
  1. Prodomo uses only select 100% Arabica and that's the finest coffee bean you can buy.
  2. The Prodomo roast is "Medium" and satisfies most coffee-drinkers.
  3. It is full-bodied, but Prodomo has been refined to remove bitterness and irritants.
  4. The lower acidity level helps to make Prodomo easier on the stomach.
  5. The aroma is pleasant and rich, and enhances the taste-experience for Prodomo-drinkers.
  6. It's available in whole bean form, as a ground coffee, in a milder version, and even decaffeinated.
How to brew Dallmayr Prodomo:
For the optimal flavor, Dallmayr recommends 7 grams of ground Prodomo for each 8-ounce cup of coffee in a standard drip-style brewing machine.  A level teaspoon of ground coffee equals about 6 grams. Therefore, for an 8-cup brewer try using about 9 level tablespoons of Prodomo.  Obviously, you may need to change that basic recipe if you prefer your coffee a little stronger or a little less strong.  This is just a starting point.


Where to buy Dallmayr Prodomo:
If you are in München, please buy it at the Haus of Dallmayr.  But don't be surprised to see Dallmayr Prodomo in your local supermarket here in the USA.  Yes; it's really becoming that popular!  Naturally, you can also visit the "Prodomo Coffee" page at www.GermanDeli.com and shop online.

GermanDeli.com has been around for the last 14 years serving those lusting for goodies from the Heimatland.  FULL DISCLOSURE:  I'm one of the owners.  And I am a very proud owner.  Why? Well,  because we really do have the best selection of German, Austrian, and Swiss food in the USA.  We have on average 3,500 products in stock in the summer and almost 5,000 products October - December.  And we really do know how to ship chocolate and meat in the middle of a hot summer from hot Texas to hot Florida or anywhere there is a heatwave. And our customer service is top notch!

Oh, and we have the best slogan in the business:  "It's not about the food; It's about the memories."  Just ask any German who has been away from Germany for more than a week or two and I bet they will agree.

BONUS: 
Watch a 30-second German TV Commercial about Prodomo coffee:
#1: Coming home to something special
#2: The Usual?
Watch a documentary about the Haus of Dallmayr (it's in the German language, without subtitles, but still worth watching): The Haus of Dallmayr

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

MAIFEST

May is a special month in Germany, often celebrated with a Maifest (May Festival).  If the timing is right, many towns try to hold their festivals on the first of May, or as close to the first of May as possible.  However, the official kickoff of spring can be scheduled anytime during the month of May.

It's traditional to set up a Maibaum (Maypole) where brightly colored ribbons are intertwined around the pole as dancers perform intricate movements in a circle around the pole.

Parades, music, festival food, and rides for the children are typical, but some communities try to outdo each other by organizing events that include crowning a Maikönigpaar (May King and Queen) and feature elaborate galas where festival-goers dress to impress.

The official drink of these festivals is a Maibowle (May Punch).  Recipes can vary, but typically include a mixture of white wine and sparkling wine (Sekt) and, very often, a syrup called "Waldmeister" (made from the Sweet Woodruff plant) is added to give the punch extra flavor and the traditional light green color that reminds everyone of the fresh grass and leaves we look forward to seeing after the winter snows melt away.

Germany's May Punch (Maibowle) is often a spring green color.

Maibowle Recipe:Ingredients:
5 limes (or lemons) 
4 tbsp (or to taste) Waldmeistersirup (Woodruff Syrup)
3 cups dry white wine, like Riesling
3 cups German sparkling wine (Sekt) or Champagne 
Preparation:
Remove zest from 2 limes, then slice limes. Juice the other 3 limes to make 6 tbsp lime juice. Pour chilled wine into a large punch bowl. Add Waldmeister syrup, lime zest and lime slices to wine. Add champagne & serve immediately. 
All amounts are approximate. Feel free to adapt the recipe to your taste.
GermanDeli.com has been around for the last 14 years serving those lusting for goodies from the Heimatland.  FULL DISCLOSURE:  I'm one of the owners.  And I am a very proud owner.  Why? Well,  because we really do have the best selection of German, Austrian, and Swiss food in the USA.  We have on average 3,500 products in stock in the summer and almost 5,000 products October - December.  And we really do know how to ship chocolate and meat in the middle of a hot summer from hot Texas to hot Florida or anywhere there is a heatwave. And our customer service is top notch!

Oh, and we have the best slogan in the business:  "It's not about the food; It's about the memories."  Just ask any German who has been away from Germany for more than a week or two and I bet they will agree.

Friday, April 19, 2013

German Cheese

German cheese varieties are sought-after across the globe for their outstanding quality and versatility.   In Germany cheese is called "Käse”, pronounced  "KAY-zeh" and sometimes spelled "Kaese".  Often the word for the type of cheese is followed by the word Käse.  For example, Hand Cheese is often written as "Handkäse".


German cheese:  Something for every taste 

Hard cheeses are extremely popular all over Germany, but nowhere more so than in Bavaria and in the Alpine region of Germany.  The moisture content of German hard cheese is low and often these cheeses are aged for months, often years, giving them an especially long shelf life.  You will notice that the longer the aging; the more pungent the taste and aroma tends to be.  German hard cheeses are a must on a cheese platter.

German Hard Cheese

Semi-soft German cheeses are rich and creamy.  Flavors range from mild and buttery (Camembert is an example) to bold and pungent (Limburger, for example).  These palate-pleasing cheeses can highlight an elaborate multi-course dinner, a humble supper, or a continental breakfast.  They are perfect with fruit & crackers as a snack or they can provide the perfect finish to a meal as a substitute for a sweet dessert.  

Semi-soft cheese is popular in Germany

Hand-cheese (Handkäse or Harzerkäse) and Cook-cheese (Kochkäse) are uniquely German cheeses.  Kochkäse has a distinctive texture and is typically spread on bread.  It is sold in small tubs and in varieties that can include caraway seeds.  Kochkäse tends to settle into the shape of whatever container you place it in.   Handkäse, on the other hand, is not spreadable.  It is a roll of semi-firm cheese, often with a pungent aroma,  that is sliced and put on bread.  Another serving method is to slice the cheese and place it into a marinade of oil, vinegar, onions, and spices.  Once the cheese absorbs some of the marinade it is served with bread on the side and is called “Handkäse mit Musik”.   


Kochkäse & Harzerkäse are German specialty cheeses

Quark is a soft, creamy, and very versatile cheese.  It is often incorporated into baked German-style cheesecake.  It can be whipped or blended with sugar or sweeteners and other ingredients for a variety of sweet pastries or cakes.  However, its slightly tart taste makes Quark a great savory spread with bread or crackers when topped with onions, chives, or scallions and a little paprika.  It makes a delicious sweet dessert when slightly sweetened and then layered with fruit, either fresh or preserved.  Another popular treatment in Germany is to blend Quark with sweet fruit jams, jellies, purees, honey, or sugar beet syrup (Zuckerrübensirup). It's even perfectly acceptable to top a chocolate spread with a little quark as an interesting play off each other..

Savory or sweet versions of Quark are popular in Germany
My company, GermanDeli.com, features several German cheese varieties.  Warning:  If you take a peek at the cheeses on this link, you might just be tempted to go a little "Käse-crazy". - Inga

(By the way, these mouth-watering photos are the property of GermanDeli.com.  Please don't "borrow" them without written permission of the owner.)

Wednesday, April 10, 2013

German food in America

You don't just stumble into the online German food business.  Okay; you stumble a little.  But mostly you proceed like you know what you're doing; even when you don't.  Even when you are still putting the all the pieces together years after setting up shop.

Setting up shop as GermanDeli.com happened back in 1998, when online shopping was still in its infancy and prospective customers, if they owned a computer at all, were typically using painfully slow dial-up connections to browse the Internet. 

Back then great domain names weren't already all taken, so our name "GermanDeli.com" quickly struck a cord with German Ex-pats and US consumers craving hard-to-find German food and groceries.

It was not long before our customers trained us and helped turn us into a legitimate business.  They demanded certain products so our inventory grew from 40 products to well over 4,000 products.  They told us they wanted their products to arrive faster, fresher, and cheaper so we found ways to do that.  They demanded to be kept informed about their orders so we created the world's best OPS (Order Processing System).

Now those customers are demanding that we keep Germany's food tradition alive.  They are insisting that we help educate a new generation about the joys of German, Swiss, and Austrian cuisine.  So we're stepping up to the plate with cooking videos, recipes, hints, tips, techniques, and product-sourcing.

Please feel free to make suggestions and recommendations for this blog.